Category Archives: circulation

One more time: Our content is failing our industry

The year was 2005, and the scene was a meeting of the Newspaper Next Industry Task Force — some of the best and most innovative minds in the newspaper business.

In midstream, the brilliant and irascible Lincoln Millstein, then head of digital for the Hearst newspaper group, threw down this challenge (not his exact words, but my best recollection):

“You can’t name any other business that would leave a manager in charge of a product whose sales have fallen every year for the last 30 years!”

He rammed home the point: Newspaper circulation had been falling steadily for decades, and yet newspaper companies had left the same kinds of people in charge of content, doing the same old stuff. When were we going to get serious about changing the content to produce better results?

Amen, Lincoln. I’ve never forgotten your point. It’s as deadly accurate today as it was 12 years ago — and the results keep getting worse.

In this blog, for five years, I’ve written repeatedly about why and how our our content needs to change. We keep acting out that old cliche about insanity — doing the same thing over and over again, expecting different results.

This time, instead of trying to come up with yet another way to say it, I will point back to 13 of my previous posts. Or should I say, 13 previous attempts to open this industry’s eyes to the desperate need for change in content.

Rethinking the mission and purpose of local reporting

https://mediareset.com/2016/04/20/rethinking-the-mission-and-purpose-of-local-reporting/

Excerpt:

“So we need to start with a different question. Not, “How do we fund journalism?” but “What is the content that local people really want and need?”

“And that points me back to the core purpose of local reporting. It’s not “doing journalism.” It’s providing information every day that meets genuinely felt needs among the people who live in our communities.

“Our purpose should be to figure out what those needs are and go get that information.”

The hardest part of saving news: Changing the definition

https://mediareset.com/2015/05/21/the-hardest-part-of-saving-news-changing-the-definition/

The tiny share of web traffic we’re getting with news, what Millennials consider to be news, and a metrics approach that can lead us to more successful content.

Millennials, news and the Borneo effect

https://mediareset.com/2015/03/17/millennials-news-and-the-borneo-effect/

How the explosion in available content has reduced the demand for news. With a parable from a friend’s experience in the jungles of Borneo: If you grew up with an infinite supply of every kind of food, how much rice would you eat?

Millennials grew up with access to every kind of information; no wonder they don’t consume a lot of news. And what we should do about it.

The audience game is forever changed; will we change, too?

https://mediareset.com/2015/03/01/the-audience-game-is-forever-changed-will-we-change-too/

“The stats (presented here) show that we’re losing the audience game in a big way. So we need to do some hard thinking about which audiences in local markets have the most value and therefore are most worth pursuing.

“Home buyers? Car buyers? Job seekers? Finance, insurance and mortgage customers? What else? Then we need to set appropriate priorities among the most promising target groups and figure which solutions will work best for each of them.”

Media business model: Are you running the Scotch Tape store?

https://mediareset.com/2014/08/12/media-business-model-are-you-running-the-scotch-tape-store/

How an old Saturday Night Live sketch about the Scotch Tape store at the old mall parodies our business’s relentless concentration on news.

And how, at the “new mall” — the Web — “you can find content directly relating to every big and little interest and concern in your life. You can get content that’s immediately useful in what you’re doing or about to do. Content that’s suited to exactly who you are, to what your life situation is, to what you care about, to what makes you laugh, to what you are considering doing right now. And, with a smartphone in your hand, you can get all of this in seconds, anywhere you are.”

Why the definition of news must change in the digital age

https://mediareset.com/2014/02/18/why-the-definition-of-news-must-change-in-the-digital-age/

To understand the new landscape, every news person should take up a challenge from magazine blogger Andrew Davis, who said:

I challenge you to put yourself in the shoes of your primary audience. Spend the day consuming the content they consume, visiting the websites they visit. Then, ask yourself what you could do to make your print product more valuable given the experience you’ve just encountered.“

And not just print, of course. We’re a local information franchise, print and digital. To get back to success, we need to start over by understanding the appetites that are driving our desired audiences today.

The big picture: Mass media era was the blink of an eye

https://mediareset.com/2013/12/17/the-big-picture-mass-media-era-was-the-blink-of-an-eye/

Excerpt: “Let’s put it in individual human terms. For 200,000 years, you could get hardly any information about anything. For 150 years, you could get whatever someone decided to print or broadcast. And now, from about the year 2000 on, you can get just about any information you want, from just about any source, wherever you happen to be.”

Excerpt: “On a planet where everyone can get virtually any information, what new models can we discover for engaging their attention, for being indispensable, for supplying information they aren’t willing to live without? And how can we help businesses take advantage of the vast new range of audience-reaching channels and technologies — whether we own them or not — that are penetrating every waking moment of human consciousness? And get paid for it?”

Desperately needed: More innovation on the audience side

https://mediareset.com/2013/10/14/desperately-needed-more-innovation-on-the-audience-side/

A visual rendering of the change in our world that’s destroying our old, keyhole-based business model.

1950s:

Today:

We’ve lost the keyhole effect. Now how do we attract an audience? A list of seven specific kinds of content that would draw like crazy.

Everyday goal for media companies: Be the greatest show on earth

https://mediareset.com/2013/07/15/everyday-goal-for-local-media-companies-the-greatest-show-on-earth/

Now that we’re in competition with all the information available on the planet, we have to win our audiences every day by the value of what we offer them. So the job of the publisher, the editor and the VP of content/audience (if there is one) needs to be: Produce content throughout the day — every day — that no one can live without.

Seven kinds of “new news” for the 21st century

https://mediareset.com/2013/02/13/seven-kinds-of-new-news-for-the-21st-century/

A deeper description of the seven kinds of content that would draw audience like crazy in any local market.

Part 1: The Mass Media bubble

https://mediareset.com/2012/05/01/the-mass-media-era-a-150-year-bubble-now-ending/

My first explanation of the paradigm-shattering concept of  “The Infinite Pipe.” This is one of three foundational posts from which virtually every other post in my five years of blogging is derived.

“The Infinite Pipe” — the history of human access to information over 200,000 years — reveals what’s happening to the entire mass-media business today, and why.

Part II — The end of the Mass Media era

https://mediareset.com/2012/04/30/part-ii-the-end-of-the-mass-media-era/

What happens when information goes from limited to infinite? Five basic changes that are swamping the mass media businesses in a tsunami far larger than we can imagine.

Part III — What about news?

https://mediareset.com/2012/04/29/part-iii-what-about-news/

In this post, five years ago, I threw down the gauntlet for the first time:

“So it’s time for a fundamental awakening in local media businesses. We need to stop thinking of our communities as places where news happens and we report it. We need to start thinking of our communities as places where people lead their lives and we help them do it. We need to figure how to provide solutions they will regard as essential in their own lives and will use over and over every day. News has its place in this, but it’s a far bigger assignment than news.”

In conclusion

Folks, the game isn’t over. But we will continue to lose if we don’t wake up to the fact that we are responsible for producing content that works in today’s information systems, for people who are living today’s lives.

It’s change or die.

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Local media need to think bigger about the Big Data opportunity

Data, data, data. From every direction lately, I’m being hit with urgent reminders about the imperative for local media companies to master data.

Every day, I’m more convinced: This is the next wave of threat — or opportunity — for local media companies. That’s how disruptive innovation works — you either grab the opportunity, or you are overrun by it.

As Big Data marches down upon us, I’m reminded of Longfellow’s poem, “The Midnight Ride of Paul Revere.” It tells how, on the eve of the American Revolution, patriots gave warning of the British Army’s advance by hanging lanterns in the belfry of Boston’s Old North Church:

“One if by land, two if by sea.”

I’m hanging out three lanterns. Big Data is bearing down on us right now — by land, by sea and from every other direction. Read the rest of this entry

See Big Data and glimpse the future of advertising

I’ve been getting a series of demos from Big Data providers as we at Morris Publishing Group work to figure out how we will offer Big Data services to local advertisers.

Just lately, we’ve been getting down into the details. For me, this brought a profound leap in comprehension.

It was like staring  into a crystal ball and seeing a monumental event that’s about to change your life. Read the rest of this entry

Big media sales opportunity: Take Big Data to Main Street

What if your local media company had a product that could make local businesses say, “Wow! Can you really do that???”

That’s the Holy Grail of media sales — a solution that meets an urgent need for customers in a way they have never before thought possible.

I saw that kind of solution a couple of weeks ago. I promise you — it will be big. Read the rest of this entry

The audience game is forever changed; will we change, too?

Media folks, can we all agree on this statement?

  • We’re in the audience business.

If you disagree, we need to talk, and we’ll do that in a minute.

But first, here’s the nut graf:

As an audience business, we’re overdue for a drastic rethink of what we do. Too often, we’re still doing 20th-century audience thinking amid the starkly different realities of the 21st century. We’re getting pounded on the audience front, and we have to figure out what audience strategies will work in this new environment. Read the rest of this entry

Media disruption: Bad for us, wonderful for humanity

Disruption of the mass media is a big subject. But here’s an even bigger one: The incredible amount of good this same disruption is bringing to humanity worldwide.

So let’s forget about the mass media for a few minutes. Let’s take a look at the massive and mostly positive impact this digital revolution is having and will continue to have on humanity. Read the rest of this entry

Why the definition of news must change in the digital age

Nothing is more deeply ingrained in the newspaper industry than the definition of news. It’s the foundation of what we do, the “product” we use to attract and serve consumer audiences, and the platform on which we sell most of our advertising.

Now the definition desperately needs fundamental change, as I’ll document below. If we hope to be relevant and engaging to the people in our markets, we need to start over, beginning with a fresh answer to the question, “What is news?” Read the rest of this entry

Four huge takeaways from Borrell’s “The Future of Legacy Media”

When your industry is undergoing massive disruption, getting a glimpse of the future is priceless. The more you know about where things are going, the smarter you can be about what to do right now.

For that reason, the report released earlier this month by Borrell Associates — “The Future of Legacy Media” — should be required reading for everyone responsible for the health and sustainability of any legacy media business in the United States and Canada. Read the rest of this entry

The big picture: Mass media era was the blink of an eye

Image converted using ifftoany

In the midst of major change, we can only make the right moves if we properly understand what’s happening.

Right now, we in the mass media are wrestling with the most massive change we’ve ever seen. But, as in the parable of the blind men and the elephant, we’re only aware of the tiny part of this change that we touch every day. Read the rest of this entry

Desperately needed: More innovation on the audience side

Just how disrupted is the old newspaper business model — the model that’s centered on providing news to a geographic market?

A lot more disrupted than many people in the news media think.

The local media industry is scrambling to innovate around sales. This is seen, for example, in the race to create new digital sales teams and agencies selling digital marketing solutions to small and medium businesses. And the industry is innovating around costs by consolidating, outsourcing and otherwise whacking at the high costs of producing and distributing its products.

But I don’t see a lot of innovation happening around the content model that’s been the basis of the newspaper business for the last 100 — even 200 — years. Read the rest of this entry