Category Archives: Advertising

Local retailers need e-commerce, so let’s give it to ’em

The 2015 Top 500 Guide, now in its 12th edition, ranks the 500 leading web merchants in the U.S. and Canada by 2014 online sales and other key metrics. (PRNewsFoto/Internet Retailer)

A recent email from Internet Retailer grabbed my attention.

Its purpose was to plug their new annual Top 500 Guide — a huge directory packed with stats on who’s big in e-commerce, who’s growing market share and who’s not.

But what caught my eye was their take on what’s new in the data.

For years, it said, previous guides had shown big-box stores getting drubbed in e-commerce sales by web-only e-tailers.

“But,” the email said, “…that began changing in 2013, when the chains closed the gap by growing their online sales by 16.7%, taking market share away from manufacturers and catalogers…. Read the rest of this entry

Content marketing: Time to jump on the opportunity

Incredibly beautiful spiral galaxy somewhere in deep spaceInfinite bandwidth.

For those of us in traditional media, it’s the source of our problems, and it’s also the uncharted space of our new opportunities.

With bandwidth rising toward infinity and costs falling to near zero, it’s enabling all sorts of new content models to eat our lunch. “Free” digital bandwidth has enabled all of our disrupters, from early ones like Craigslist and Facebook and to newer ones like BuzzFeed, Instagram and SnapChat. And more will keep coming. Read the rest of this entry

The audience game is forever changed; will we change, too?

Media folks, can we all agree on this statement?

  • We’re in the audience business.

If you disagree, we need to talk, and we’ll do that in a minute.

But first, here’s the nut graf:

As an audience business, we’re overdue for a drastic rethink of what we do. Too often, we’re still doing 20th-century audience thinking amid the starkly different realities of the 21st century. We’re getting pounded on the audience front, and we have to figure out what audience strategies will work in this new environment. Read the rest of this entry

Local media need to join the fight for in-store traffic

In the local media business, whatever hurts retailers hurts us, too. They’re feeling a big hurt right now, and we need to help them fight back.

That big hurt is a steady and continuous decline in store traffic. This means loss of sales, and that leads nowhere good for them — or for local media.

Read the rest of this entry

How to change behavior in your disrupted organization

Cropped handsWhen a company or industry is beset by massive disruption — as the traditional media have been for more than a decade now — it creates two massive challenges:

  1. Figuring out how the business has to change.
  2. Changing behaviors in the organization to get the new things done.

As most people in the newspaper industry can testify, both of these are difficult and relentless. There’s no “one and done” in a disruption as massive as the digital revolution.

And, unfortunately, success at No. 1 is no guarantee of success at No. 2.

Over last three years, I’ve blogged frequently about No. 1. This time let’s look at No. 2. Read the rest of this entry

Think bigger than native advertising

One of the biggest challenges legacy media companies face today is learning to think big enough to meet the real 21st-century needs of advertisers.

There’s a lot of talk about native advertising right now. Done right, it can help to meet those real needs. But native is, at best, only a small piece of a much bigger puzzle.

For those who learn how to solve that bigger puzzle for advertisers, the payoff can be much greater than just another sale of print space, air time or digital display units. Read the rest of this entry

The local media company of the future: Selling what, and selling how?

What does the local media company of the future look like?

At this point, the answer is pretty clear. There will be two kinds of media companies:

  • Those that continue to focus on their traditional media channels — newspaper, broadcast television channel, radio station(s) — and therefore shrink along with the advertising spending on those media.
  • Those that morph into local media houses that can connect any advertiser with any audience, through platforms, technologies and channels they own or don’t, to win dollars that are moving into digital advertising and marketing.

Read the rest of this entry

Media business model: Are you running the Scotch Tape store?

If you’re old enough to remember Saturday Night Live in its glory days, maybe you remember the hilarious sketches set in the Scotch Tape store at the old mall.

The bit was centered on, and got its laughs from, a ridiculously narrow business model centered on a single product, sold in a retail location that was no longer the cool place to be. (I’d love to link to a clip here, but I couldn’t find one. NBC must be closely guarding its copyright.)

Those sketches came to mind this week as I was trying to think of a metaphor for the newspaper business and its relentless concentration on news. News continues to be our industry’s central purpose and the heart of its business model for attracting audiences.

I laughed out loud when it occurred to me that we might be well on the way to becoming the Scotch Tape store, or “Scotch Boutique,” as they called it. But the idea is as painful as it is funny. Read the rest of this entry

Native advertising — what is it, and why now

“I want my ad to go right here,” Jerry Coolman said. He pointed at the middle two columns at the top of the newspaper page — right in the middle of an article. He wanted his ad for lawn tractors to hit readers smack between the eyes.

“Jerry, we can’t do that,” I said. “That’s the reader’s space — we can’t plunk an ad down in the middle of it.”

That was 1983. Now, 30 years later, it turns out we can plunk an ad down in the reader’s space. It’s being done more and more, and it’s being called by a new name: “native advertising.” Read the rest of this entry

How Morris is reversing the biggest disruption: Loss of advertising accounts

About five years ago, on a weekend, Derek May — then publisher of the St. Augustine (FL) Record — was doing what many publishers were doing at the time: Trying to figure out the steep decline in advertising revenue he was seeing in his unit’s financials.

What was the main cause of the decline? The recession was the driver, of course, but was it mainly hitting certain categories of advertising? Certain types of advertisers? Big advertisers? Small advertisers? Read the rest of this entry